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Latest Articles

How Not To Fight Violent Extremism
By Stephen Blank, The American Spectator, February 27, 2015

What could the White House have been thinking? The Obama administration's recently concluded Summit on Countering Violent Extremism was a high-profile affair, bringing together key world leaders and decisionmakers on a critical topic at a critical time. But it was also punctuated by instances of stunning tone-deafness, and a profound failure to understand the dynamics of terrorism in its many forms. 

Don't Ignore Iran Dangers
By Lawrence J. Haas, CNN.com, February 27, 2015

Desperately pursuing a nuclear deal with Iran, scrapping old positions and offering new concessions at a mind-boggling pace, the Obama administration has lost sight of what this regime represents and why the United States and its allies have focused on its nuclear program to begin with. 

Watch Africa in fight against ISIL
By Ilan Berman, USA Today, February 26, 2015

MARRAKESH, Morocco — It's a truism of broadcast media that "If it bleeds, it leads." The field of counterterrorism functions much the same way, which is why in recent months the Islamic State terrorist group have become the overwhelming focus of Western law enforcement and intelligence. Yet an equally significant security challenge is incubating in Africa, where local conditions have sown the seeds for the next stage of global terror.

 


What Americans Really Think About Iran's Nukes
By Ilan Berman, The Hill, February 26, 2015

To hear the White House tell it, our nagging Iranian problem might soon be a thing of the past. As the March deadline for nuclear negotiations nears, administration officials and sympathetic onlookers have become increasingly optimistic about an impending breakthrough with the Islamic Republic over its atomic ambitions.

A Global Popularity Contest
By Ilan Berman, The National Interest, February 25, 2015

Is Russia making a global comeback in spite of Western sanctions and political pressure from the United States and Europe? On the surface, it certainly seems like it.


Latest In-House Bulletins

Russia Reform Monitor - No. 1960
March 2, 2015

Russia: a champion of European security;
Once again, Moscow is the main enemy

 

 

Russia Reform Monitor - No. 1959
February 28, 2015

Help for "strategic" companies;
Savchenko: A symbol of the Russia-Ukraine conflict

 

 

China Reform Monitor - No. 1147
February 25, 2015

Prominent Chinese academic warns of war on intellectuals;
Russia busts major drug trafficking ring from China

 

 

Russia Reform Monitor - No. 1958
February 24, 2015

A shrinking budget for Russia's media blitz;
Pentagon report: Putin has Aspberger's

 

 

South Asia Security Monitor - No. 359
February 24, 2015

China offers to mediate Afghan peace talks;
Musharraf: ISI worked with Taliban;
Sri Lanka to go ahead with China port deal;
Reps. Royce, Engel urge tougher measures on Pakistan;
Sirisena visits India, signs nuclear deal

 


Latest Policy Papers

Redefining Cybersecurity
By Trey Herr and Allan Friedman , January 22, 2015

Cybersecurity is an often abused and much misused term that was once intended to describe and now serves better to confuse. While originally intended to cover security related issues associated with “cyberspace,” a phrase coined by author William Gibson in the short story “Burning Chrome,” it has become the byword for a staggeringly diverse array of topics. While this is frustrating, the term is popular as shorthand, so we offer this paper to identify and explain four clusters of related topics under the larger umbrella of “cybersecurity.”  Each is a distinct issue area with unique technical and policy challenges, while retaining some association to the others...

American Deterrence and Future Conflicts
By Dr. Jacquelyn K. Davis , December 22, 2014

On the centennial of the start of World War I—a war that began largely as a result of crisis miscalculations

and escalations—we are entering a new era with important implications for deterrence, escalation control, and coalition management. Today, like at the time of World War I, we confront a large number of actors who have the potential to misread cues and red lines while relying on treaty relationships if they miscalculate. Then, as now, military technologies were widely diffused. Prevailing assumptions about how an adversary (or potential adversary) would react in a crisis or confrontation were based on imperfect intelligence and inadequate understanding of red lines...

U. S. & European Perspectives of Current and Evolving Security Challenges
By ´┐╝John P. Rose, Ph.D , October 31, 2014

As we think through the role that the United States might play in addressing future security challenges in the European and Eurasian arenas in coming years, it would seem appropriate to have some indication of the thinking, thoughts, and ideas of our partners and allies—especially those in NATO. Americans may feel strongly about issues such as missile defense, countering terrorism and stopping Iran from developing a nuclear capability, but do European and Eurasian allies feel the same?...

Protecting the Warfighter in an Austere Budget Environment
By David J. Trachtenberg , September 24, 2014

Winston Churchill is often quoted as saying, “Gentlemen, we have run out of money. Now we have to think.” A similar statement is attributed to Ernest Rutherford, a New Zealand physicist often cited as the “father” of nuclear physics. Regardless of who uttered this quote, many believe it appropriately summarizes the state of America’s defense establishment today. “Fiscal austerity” is the environment in which national security decisions are made...