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Latest Articles

Negotiating The Future Of Ukraine
By Stephen Blank, USA Today, April 16, 2014

Albert Einstein is said to have defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Today, U.S. policy toward Ukraine has become the embodiment of Einstein's admonition.

The Clock Is Ticking in Afghanistan
By John Wilson, U.S. News & World Report, April 15, 2014

International attention is now riveted on the crisis in Ukraine, but another beleaguered U.S. ally is rapidly approaching a critical crossroads as well. As the U.S. military prepares to exit Afghanistan after more than a decade of war, real questions remain about the country’s future. Perhaps most urgent, and of greatest significance to the United States, is the capacity of Afghanistan’s forces to successfully fight the Taliban and al-Qaida.

Why The U.S.-India Relationship Is Far From 'Oversold'
By Jeff M. Smith, Foreign Policy, April 14, 2014

With national elections in India taking place this month, the health of the U.S.-India relationship is under the spotlight, and the early prognosis is relatively grim. The sudden resignation of the U.S. Ambassador to India and a rocky start to relations with favored prime minister candidate Narendra Modi are symbolic of a broader malaise that has afflicted Indo-U.S. relations since 2008.

Western Policy, Post-Crimea
By Ilan Berman, National Review Online, April 7, 2014

By all accounts, Vladimir Putin appears to be winning. Over the past month, Russia’s wily president has managed to orchestrate the asymmetric invasion of a neighboring state (Ukraine) and annex a new territory into the Russian Federation (Crimea).

U.S. Can’t Bribe Israelis, Palestinians To Make Peace
By Lawrence J. Haas, International Business Times, April 3, 2014

“First as tragedy, second as farce.” It’s Karl Marx’s line about history repeating itself but, per the Jonathan Pollard trial balloon of recent days, the line could just as easily apply to America’s foreign policy.


Latest Books

Cold Peace: China-India Rivalry in the Twenty-First Century
Jeff M. Smith, Lexington Books, January 2014

The twenty-first century is likely to witness Asia’s two largest civilizations, China and India, join the United States in an elite club of global superpowers. By some economic indicators, the two Asian giants are already the second and third largest economies in the world, and they are developing world-class militaries to complement that economic clout. While Beijing and Delhi have spent the past half-century free from armed conflict and enjoy cordial diplomatic relations, elements of rivalry have shadowed the relationship since the two countries went to war in 1962 over their disputed Himalayan border. In the twenty-first century, that rivalry has evolved in unpredictable ways, advancing in some arenas and retreating in the face of growing cooperation in others.


Latest In-House Bulletins

Russia Reform Monitor - No. 1888
April 18, 2014

The Real Costs of Crimea;
Rasmussen: Russian imperialism a threat to Europe

Iran Democracy Monitor - No. 147
April 17, 2014

Iran puts Hezbollah's house in order;
The controversy over Aboutalebi;
Iran fights the demographic future;
Iranian energy: Out of the box

Russia Reform Monitor - No. 1887
April 16, 2014

Ukraine notwithstanding, New START trudges on;
Kyiv blasts Gazprom, lobbies NATO

Missile Defense Briefing Report - No. 324
April 16, 2014

U.S. NMD: Funding, but little strategic direction;
A hemispheric cruise missile threat;
Russian adventurism changes Europe's defense calculus;
Pentagon attempts to assure Asian allies

Eurasia Security Watch - No. 314
April 15, 2014

Balloting aborted in Iraqi province;
Israel blames Palestinians for failed peace talks;
France wants to haul Syria before the ICC;
Hezbollah: Assad government is safe


Latest Policy Papers

Defense of the U.S. Homeland Against Ballistic Missile Attack
By Baker Spring , November 15, 2013

Today, the Obama administration and Congress have a variety of options before them for strengthening the defense of the U.S. homeland against ballistic missile attack. The word “options,” however, should not be interpreted as an either/or choice. Official Washington should not—indeed, cannot choose between defending the homeland against ballistic missile attack and erecting regional capabilities against the threat. Rather, it is necessary to treat the variety of programs available for this purpose not as options, but as components of a global plan for development and fielding: essentially, an “all of the above” approach. Only in this way can America achieve the proper balance between missile defense capabilities for the protection of the United States and the protection of our friends and allies and forces in various regions around the world...