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Behind the Bombings in Volgograd
By Ilan Berman, Wall Street Journal, December 31, 2013
 

On Dec. 29, a female suicide bomber blew herself up in the main train station of Volgograd, a city of one million in southern Russia. The explosion killed 16 and wounded scores more. A day later, a similar attack targeted a trolley bus in the same city, killing at least 10. The bombings were a shot across the Kremlin's bow—and a portent of things to come.

 
Unwavering Democratic Doctrines Will Let US Shape Events Again
By Lawrence J. Haas, McClatchy-Tribune News Service, December 31, 2013
 

America's top foreign policy to-do's in 2014 include preventing Iran from reaching the nuclear threshold, addressing the humanitarian disaster in Syria, containing an expansionist Russia, managing a rising China and reclaiming its own voice on human rights. Let's take these one at a time.

 
Putin's Ukrainian Gamble
By Ilan Berman, American Spectator, December 27, 2013
 

Vladimir Putin is betting big in Ukraine. For weeks now, Russia’s wily president has worked feverishly behind the scenes to derail the former Soviet satellite’s tenuous pro-Western trajector

 
The Unique Tragedy of the Palestinian Refugees
By Avi Jorisch, Al-Arabiya, December 18, 2013
 

UNRWA, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, is tasked with assisting Palestinian refugees. The films, pictures, slides and prints the organization has collected on the refugees' plight will now be displayed in Jerusalem's Old City in an exhibit entitled "The Long Journey," which will then tour Europe and North America. The images, available online, are heartbreakingly powerful and emotive.

 
The Real Cost of Geneva
By Ilan Berman, National Review Online, December 17, 2013
 

Start preparing for Pax Iranica. That is the unspoken message behind the interim nuclear agreement hammered out between the P5+1 powers and Iran in Geneva last month. For, despite the insistence in Washington and European capitals that it is only temporary, the new deal has nonetheless prompted what amounts to a seismic shift in Middle Eastern politics.

 
Moscow Could Be Big Loser In Ukraine Protests
By Ilan Berman, USA Today, December 10, 2013
 

You have to hand it to the Ukrainians. They sure know how to stage a revolution.

In November of 2004, popular outrage over the dubious victory of pro-Kremlin candidate Viktor Yanukovych in presidential elections blatantly manipulated by Moscow brought hundreds of thousands into the streets in what came to be known as the "Orange Revolution." The protesters succeeded beyond their wildest dreams; over the course of two months, the original results of the vote were annulled and a new election held. In it, popular, Western-leaning candidate Viktor Yushchenko handily defeated Yanukovych in what was widely seen as a referendum for a new national direction — one free of Russian influence.

 
Iran Checkmates the P5+1
By Avi Jorisch, Al-Arabiya, December 3, 2013
 

In the deal between Iran and the six world powers, it appears that a rogue regime marching towards nuclearization has outmaneuvered the West. In disarming the sanctions regime so painstakingly put together over the last few years, the Iranians have given almost nothing meaningful in return. Instead, they are employing the same playbook that brought the mullahcracy to power and the very strategy that allowed North Korea to get the bomb. Above all, Iran now has an international mechanism that will allow it to effectively play for time.

 
After Geneva, Some Hard Choices For Jerusalem
By Ilan Berman, Forbes.com, December 3, 2013
 

You’ve got to feel sorry for Benjamin Netanyahu. Just six months ago, with his government facing what was arguably the most favorable strategic environment in recent memory, Israel’s prime minister could wax cautiously optimistic.

 
Pro&Con: Deal will make an Iranian atom bomb more likely
By Lawrence J. Haas, South Coast Today, November 30, 2013
 

The six-month deal between U.S.-led negotiators and Iran will make an Iranian atomic bomb more likely, not less, because it significantly strengthens the very regime in Tehran that so desperately wants nuclear weaponry.

 
The Day the Music Died?
By Ilan Berman, National Review Online, November 25, 2013
 

The deal hammered out over the weekend between the P5+1 powers and Iran in Geneva should have come as a surprise to no one. The White House’s dogged pursuit of some sort of diplomatic breakthrough with Iran, whatever the political and international-security cost, meant that an agreement — no matter how bad — was in the offing, unless the Iranians themselves decided it wasn’t in their interest.