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Defense Technology Monitor - No. 30
Bulletins - July 16, 2018
 

Dispelling the "Fog of Data";
Unleashing the Gremlins;
Navigating the virtual battlefield;
How to traffic hypersonic weapons

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2231
Bulletins - July 11, 2018
 

Putin's cult of personality;
A quiet campaign of digital intrusion

 
Russian Ground Battlefield Robots: A Candid Evaluation and Ways Forward
Articles - June 25, 2018
 

Russia, like many other nations, is investing in the development of various unmanned military systems. The Russian defense establishment sees such systems as mission multipliers, highlighting two major advantages: saving soldiers’ lives and making military missions more effective. In this context, Russian developments are similar to those taking place around the world. Various militaries are fielding unmanned systems for surveillance, intelligence, logistics, or attack missions to make their forces or campaigns more effective. In fact, the Russian military has been successfully using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in training and combat since 2013. It has used them with great effect in Syria, where these UAVs flew more mission hours than manned aircraft in various Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) roles.

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 29
Bulletins - May 25, 2018
 

Increasingly, robots on the front lines;
DPRK threat triggers new missile defense focus on planes...;
...and drones;
Turkey's new underwater drone; Understanding EMP threats;
Weaponizing ink

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 28
Bulletins - May 14, 2018
 

Slowing soldiers' biological clocks;
How 3D printers are increasing efficiency in weapons production;
Needed: Private sector help on AI;
China constructs hypersonic testing facility;
Loud, non-lethal lasers

 
Understanding North Korea's Cyber Strategy
Policy Papers - May 4, 2018
 
How does North Korea use cyber means to achieve its political and military objectives? Ever since the Korean War, North Korea’s stated foreign policy goal has been to reunify the Korean peninsula under its rule. However, by the 1980s, winning a conventional war on the peninsula had become unrealistic, and the military balance between the North and South had started to shift in favor of the latter. With the end of the Cold War, Russian and Chinese patronage diminished, while the U.S.-ROK alliance grew stronger. In this strategic context, how does North Korea ensure regime security, deter foreign aggression, and achieve this objective without explicitly taking it by force?...
 
The Other Iranian Threat
Articles - April 17, 2018
 

Whatever happened to the Iranian cyberthreat? Not all that long ago, American officials were preoccupied with the growing disruptive capabilities that the Islamic Republic had begun to demonstrate on the World-Wide Web. That, however, was before the start of negotiations over Iran's atomic program in 2013. Those talks allowed Iran's cyber activities to recede from public view, as policymakers in Washington focused their attention on nuclear diplomacy with Tehran, while Iranian hackers temporarily became more cautious in their choice of targets and the visibility of their attacks. More recently, worries about Iran's cyber capabilities have taken a back seat to concerns regarding Iran's growing conventional military might, and its mounting regional adventurism in places like Syria and Yemen.

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 27
Bulletins - April 12, 2018
 

China takes the lead in railgun development;
Seeking more missile defense in the Pacific;
Needed: A rulebook for cyberwarfare;
Iran's drones get an upgrade;
Up next: Robotic submarine hunters

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2203
Bulletins - April 5, 2018
 

Greater NATO resolve needed;
Another poisoning in London

 
In AI, Russia Is Hustling To Catch Up
Articles - April 4, 2018
 

When Vladimir Putin said last fall that artificial intelligence is "humanity's future" and that the country that masters it will "get to rule the world," some observers guessed that the Russian president was hinting at unrevealed progress and breakthroughs in the field. But a glance at publicly available statistics indicates otherwise. Russia's annual domestic investment in AI is probably around 700 million rubles ($12.5 million) - a paltry sum next to the billions being spent by American and Chinese companies. Even if private-sector investment rises as expected to 28 billion rubles ($500 million) by 2020, that will still be just a fraction of the global total.